Capturing The Human Animal Safely

Some have referred to cities and communities as, “It’s a jungle out there,” in reference to a song written by Randy Newman.  In fact, some websites cater to policing agencies with survival equipment.  One such supplier product is called, The “CamelBak Urban Assault Pack, Perfect for the urban jungle.”

Without question it’s a jungle out there, and we can all appreciate the need to keep not only police safe, but the public as well.

Some object to the term, “human animal”  and I have argued this point with KGO radio talk host Ray Taliaferro.  He often refers to Homo sapiens as, “Human Animals.” I argue they are in a species all of their own.

Animals are instinctive like Squirrels.  They gather nuts and place them in a special location later to be used in the wild or in a cage.  It’s a naturally occurring event, like clockwork.

Animals don’t confer on nuclear disarmament.  Some may argue this point as well.  However, humans do display animal like aggressive behavior without question.

Police often times encounter animalistic behavior while policing the street of our urban jungle; in fact some may question the use of this analogy as well.  However, there’s no denying the fact that police have no idea what they may encounter during the course of their shift or while driving and patrolling the streets of the so called asphalt jungle.

We recently witnessed and read in the news of a disabled man in a wheel chair shot by the San Francisco police.  San Francisco police Chief George Gascón argued that if his officers were equipped with Tazers® the outcome would have been much different.

The jury is still out on this one, but Tazers are on the top of the list with the most fatalities of all of the less-than-lethal devices.  By some accounts,  the Taser related death toll now hovers around 530 plus in North America alone.

http://truthnottasers.blogspot.com/

There should be no question about the need to reexamine alternatives in light of evolving technologies with respect to the use of Tazers.  One such alternative was jointly developed by the US Army and Foster-Miller called WebShot®.  On one of their sales brochures, which is no longer in distribution, WebShot® describes itself as a – *Nonlethal Entanglement Technology System (NETS).

WebShot® NETS* is a less lethal system that gives law enforcement officials an alternative method to catch, subdue and arrest criminals.  Foster-Miller developed this system to combine speed and positive capture effectiveness in a compact, lightweight and standard weapons package.  This device is the only response that can:

• Capture without pain compliance (complement other techniques).

• Restrict movement (both flight and fight).

• Minimize injury and collateral damage.

• Works indoors, outdoors and in all types of weather.

• Fits as a standard weapon or a customized, recyclable launcher.

• Neutralize threatening animals.

WebShot® NETS is an essential tool in the force continuum and contributes to a positive, responsible image in the community policing effort of law enforcement officials. WebShot® NETS is intended for use by Law Enforcement, Corrections, and Animal Control Officers ONLY.

There we go Mr. Taliaferro, capturing the human animal safely.  I guess the whole point in all of this is if you must shoot someone that is obviously going through the stages of a psychiatric meltdown with a knife or potato peeler in his hands, please consider what appears to be a more humane high-tech solution rather than death by electrocution.

See: Spiderman tool will help police cast net on suspects http://bit.ly/gVC3Zw

Tazer Dart vs. Net Capture
Tazer Dart vs. Net Capture
Net Capture vs Tazer Dart Penetrating Orbit Socket
Capture Net Gun
Capture Net Deployment
Intended Suspect Target
Suspect Captured Safely

One Reply to “Capturing The Human Animal Safely”

  1. I E Mailed the Henderson Nv. Police Dept. to ask why dont they use nets to subdue unruly people. The answer was they would still have a knife ??

    Have you asked any Police Departments the same question?

    T. Wilson

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